Archives for October 2016

image

Breitling Huntington Beach Airshow This Weekend!
 
 

Breitling Huntington Beach Airshow Takes to the Skies Oct. 21 – 23
Inaugural Free Airshow Headlined by Breitling Jet Team and U.S Air Force Thunderbirds

What:  The inaugural Breitling Huntington Beach Airshow, the West Coast’s only beachfront airshow, takes to the skies Oct. 21 – 23 over one of Southern California’s most popular beaches. Jaw-dropping jet stunts by the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, the Breitling Jet Team and other performers can be viewed on the 2-mile stretch of beach from the Huntington Beach Pier to Magnolia Street.  This free community event features interactive exhibits from NASA, Boeing and Ford with more than a mile of souvenir and specialty item shopping, including an official airshow shirt. Dozens of premium food options will provide an enjoyable culinary experience for attendees. Proceeds from the Airshow will benefit the newly formed Aerospace Education Foundation that will empower youth to achieve career goals in aviation and aerospace.

Who: The HB Airshow is being headlined by the Air Force Thunderbirds and the Breitling Jet Team that is completing a two-year North American tour with this performance. Other Airshow performers include National Aerobatic Champion Michael Goulian, an F-18 Super Hornet TAC Demonstration, Jack Link’s Screamin’ Sasquatch, Red Bull World Champion Kirby Chambliss, Lyon Air Museum’s C-47 Dakota, U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue demonstration, a FedEx flyover of a Boeing 757, esteemed aerobatic performers Bill Stein and Breitling’s David Martin.

When
Thursday, Oct. 20 – Air Force Thunderbirds complete sight survey of the HB performance area from approx. 12:50pm – 1:30pm over the ocean.
Friday, Oct. 21 – Practice day begins at noon with performances until 4pm.
Saturday, Oct. 22 – Sunday, Oct 23 – Airshow from noon – 4pm
Upgraded seating/VIP areas open at 9am

Where:  
Attendees can watch the free airshow on the beach between the Huntington Beach Pier and Magnolia St. The best viewing area will be Beach Blvd. and Pacific Coast Highway.

Airshow Parking Details:
Locals are encouraged to bike or walk to the beach. Public buses will be running and there will be a ride-sharing drop off/pick up location at Beach Blvd. and Pacific Coast Highway. Lyft is offering a discount code for first-time users. Off site busing provided by Go Ground.


Share Button
image


Our Daily Pilot ad for the Kurt Real Estate Group

From Left to Right- Justin Burnham, MaiKai Makena, Kurt Galitski, Renee Schlendering, and Andrew Ramirez- The Kurt Real Estate Group!

Share Button
image


Our Daily Pilot ad for the Kurt Real Estate Group

From Left to Right- Justin Burnham, MaiKai Makena, Kurt Galitski, Renee Schlendering, and Andrew Ramirez- The Kurt Real Estate Group!

Share Button
image





From Left to Right- Justin Burnham, MaiKai Makena, Kurt Galitski, Renee Schlendering, and Andrew Ramirez- The Kurt Real Estate Group!

Share Button
image

Imagine you’ve gotten the keys to your new house and you’ve moved in. You’re on a homebuyer’s high — until you discover a leaking roof or a snake infestation (true story). What do you do?

Here are some ways to avoid a costly post-closing catastrophe.
1. Look at the listing language
Some properties are listed for sale “as is,” but you should clarify if that means the seller is absolutely unwilling to address major safety issues that might come up in an inspection that would make it difficult for them to sell the house to any buyer, says Liane Jameson, a real estate broker in St. Petersburg, Florida. If a seller either can’t afford or doesn’t want to fork out any money for repairs, be prepared to move on, she says.
2. Know your lender’s requirements
Many mortgage lenders require that certain safety issues, such as high radon levels, a decayed roof or dangerous structural defects, be addressed before they’ll give you a loan.
3. Check out the property and seller online
If you find a house that’s been renovated recently, check your county’s online records to see if the proper building permits were pulled, says Kris Paolini, a real estate agent in Rockville, Maryland. You want to make sure that major renovations are up to code.
4. Get a home inspection
When you buy a house, even new construction, always hire your own inspector to do a thorough home inspection, which typically costs between $300 and $500, Paolini says. While an inspector might not catch everything, particularly if a seller is hiding something intentionally, you shouldn’t skip this step, because problems that pop up later could cost you big bucks.
5. Review the seller’s disclosures
Laws vary from state to state, but generally sellers are supposed to reveal any “latent defects” — problems with their property that a standard inspection can’t reasonably be expected to reveal, says Maryland real estate attorney Robert Moses. Homebuyers should always ask for repair or renovation documentation. Also, be wary of sellers who disclaim knowledge of the home’s condition; that’s a red flag, Moses says.
If you’ve moved into a home and find major problems that weren’t disclosed, you typically have two options: arbitration — mandatory or voluntary, depending on your state — or a lawsuit, Moses says. In arbitration, all parties sit down to discuss the issue and try to come to a resolution. If that doesn’t work, suing the seller, and possibly the seller’s agent, would be your next move. Litigation, however, isn’t a silver bullet; it can cost thousands of dollars and take months to resolve, Moses says.
The seller’s responsibility
If you’re selling your home, you have a legal and ethical responsibility to disclose any nonvisible defects before you put your home on the market. These might include:
Damaged roof, subfloor or walls.
Outdated electrical or plumbing systems.
Structural damage from flood, fire, wind, expansive soils or water.
Broken appliances.
Problems with major home systems (HVAC, furnace, water heater).
Structural or foundation cracks from settling.
Deborah Kearns is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. 
This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published byUSA Today.

Share Button
%d bloggers like this: